Pablo Bronstein on ‘an architecture so unloved, yet so endemic to Britain’ 5th February 2018/ Bilyana Palankasova The British-Argentinian artist Pablo Bronstein’s latest project is Conservation, or The Long Reign of Pseudo Georgian Architecture at the Royal Institute of British Architects. Focusing on what the artists himself calls ‘an architecture so unloved, yet so endemic to Britain’, the show explores the ubiquitous neo-Georgian style developments that have been built in the second half of the twentieth century, as an example of true British vernacular.

Fifty new drawings of contemporary buildings that have been erected in the second half of the twentieth century, in a seemingly Georgian style, will be displayed for the first time, together with materials from the RIBA’s Drawings Collection. Bronstein has selected the pieces from the collection himself and has developed a context for his own drawings in order to create a timeline of architectural practice, focusing on ideas such as urban fabric, social aspiration, identity and representation.

The 14 works that have been selected from the RIBA collection represent material from established architectural figures such as Colen Campbell (1676-1729), Michael Searles (1751-1813) and Robert Adam (b.1948). To create a context for the discussion regarding the growth of the Georgian style in recent British construction history, Bronstein and the curatorial team also included a selection of critical writings from issues of Building magazine from between 1975 and 2002.

The exhibition is designed by Pablo Bronstein and the architectural practice Apparata (Nicholas Lobo Brennan and Astrid Smitham). Apparata addressed the subject and the research related to the exhibition by designing the interior of the space so it resembles Georgian style, including Regency-style wallpaper.

Bronstein says that the major reason the style interests him is its ability to allude to certain delusions about the past, while praising the vanity associated with wealth and class, which makes it a style perfectly suited to the last thirty years of history.

Conservation, or The Long Reign of Pseudo Georgian Architecture is on display at the RIBA until 11 February 2018.